European wild wild cat (Felis silvestris)

  

Wild cats – individualists , living single and united only by the mating period . Plot habitat takes 1-2 acres on the Meadowlands , 50-60 acres in the mountains. Border area labeled his master fragrant secret anal glands . Males in rut in search of females can go quite far from the main residence . For permanent shelters wild cat in the woods usually chooses a low positioned hollow old trees. In the mountains, he also finds refuge in the crevices of rocks , old burrows of badgers and foxes.
It is noteworthy that in those places where a lot of badger burrows cat in them not only arranges permanent asylum , but escapes from danger, even if there are a lot of trees. Hollow or hole , intended for propagation , lined with dry grass, leaves , feathers of birds. Temporary shelters – small holes , recesses under the cliffs , sometimes dense plexus branches. In the Meadowlands cat often hiding to stay in forks of trees, in abandoned nests of herons .
Staple food forest cat and mouse up voles, the second most important place belongs to the chicken and waterfowl . In mountainous areas, he catches and eats squirrels and dormice also from birds – pheasant , chukar , partridge . In the Meadowlands its main prey – ducks of various kinds, Rallidae birds and water rats and muskrats . During breeding wild cats ravage many nests, eating eggs and chicks . In the years when many hares , wild cat hunt successfully on them. In river floodplains during shallow water fish , crayfish . Living next to a man drags a fair number of poultry.
Despite the relatively small size, forest cat – quite a serious predator. Thus, he attacks and young ungulates – deer , chamois , domestic and wild goats. In places where a lot of rats Pasyuk or Common Hamster , they come up regularly on the tooth cat , although not every dog dare attack these rather vicious rodents. Where nutria bred cat gets on the farm and drags young. Sometimes wild cats attack on members of the weasel family – on the ermine , weasel , ferret.
Cat goes on the hunt for 1-2 hours before sunset, the night takes a short rest at dawn again energetic. Most often it conceals prey and catches 2-3 jump up to 3 meters , and if the first roll fails , the victim frustrated predator often not pursued . Small rodents it stalking , sitting near the exit of the hole or gap in the rocks . In the Meadowlands cat ambush on overhanging tree over the water , which is trying to catch the duck swims paw or catch , jumping on her back . Chasing a squirrel , wild cat can climb to the tops of tall trees the most , sometimes in the heat jumps from tree to tree like a marten . Small enough sacrifice cat paws and causes death , biting through his head. Attacking a larger animal , sometimes he jumps on his back and tries to cut the neck.
This beast deftly away from any terrestrial stalker hiding in the trees or in the crevices of rocks. Wildcat good swims , but the water climbs reluctantly, even when he is being persecuted . Wild cat looking for prey with the help of hearing and sight , smell is poorly developed . Endures hard bondage , bad tamed . Voice – a fairly low hoarse meow . Like all small cats, can ” purr ” to breath and output : it provides the special structure of the larynx, which distinguishes small from large cats – panthers. In general, the vocal repertoire is varied: different emotions expressed snort , low rumbling , hissing .
Forest cat breed 1-2 times a year . The main rut occurs in January-March , at this time , and males and females more often than usual mark territory , loud and plaintive cry . Males groups Suitable for one female , from time to time fighting for its possession . Kittens first litter born in April-May , the most recent – in early December. Most often, the female bears 3-6 kittens , they are completely helpless, covered puhlyavym hair. Colouring juveniles are different from adults : the body scattered dark brown spots on the back merging into broad bands , hind legs and tail striated numerous transverse stripes. These features more than adults coloring forest cats correspond ancient type of coloring small wild cats.
Male offspring in education does not take any part . All care is on the female until the kittens are small, it does not leave them alone for long periods, carefully protects from attacks by small predators like a ferret or ermine , in case of danger drags a new lair. Feeding milk for 3-4 months , but after six months after the birth of kittens try to eat meat . At this age they begin to emerge from the nesting shelter and, as befits the younger youngsters , endlessly tinkering and playing, often climbing on standing near trees . There are at danger and hides . At two months of age kittens begin to follow on the hunt for his mother, even after 2-3 months they are separated and become independent hunters.
The European forest cat has lots of enemies that prey on it periodically . Among the most dangerous wolves, foxes , jackals . But to catch the cat ( both wild and domestic ) is very difficult because of all land-based predators , he saved the trees on which it climbs well .
Wild Forest Cat , or rather its Caucasian subspecies listed as endangered as a rare species , inhabits a defined territory .

Norwegian Forest Cat Cat

Norwegian Forest Cat Cat

Natural athletes, Norwegian Forest Cats love to investigate counters, bookcases, and the loftiest peaks of their cat trees. Wegies are active and playful and retain their fun-loving spirit well into adulthood, but don’t be fooled by the breed’s impressive muscles and all-weather exterior. They are sweet, friendly, and family-oriented, and they love their human companions. Despite the wild years in the forests of Norway, or perhaps because of it, they would much rather cuddle than prowl.

Because of those harsh survival years (perhaps), nothing fazes them much, either. They take new people and new situations in stride; as cats go, Forest Cats are the strong, silent types. They are conversely great purrers, particularly when perched beside their favorite humans. Out-going and gregarious, they tend not to bond with one person, but rather love everyone unconditionally and enthusiastically.

 

The Norwegian Forest Cat’s distinguishing double coat varies in length according to the time of year. The cat goes through a spring ‘molting,’ when the winter coat is shed, and a fall shedding, when the summer coat departs. At these times of year, thorough combing is necessary unless you want seasonal layers of cat hair on everything. The rest of the year the Forest Cat requires minimal grooming since he tends to hang onto his coat, perhaps remembering those harsh winters.

Munchkin Cat

Munchkin Cat

For their part, Munchkins, oblivious to the controversy surrounding them, go on being just what they are, cats; self-assured and outgoing. They love to wrestle and play with their long-legged feline friends, happily unaware that there’s anything different about them. Nor do their feline companions treat them like members of the vertically challenged. Only humans look at them askance.

Fanciers assert Munchkins can do anything an ordinary cat can do, except leap to the top of the bookcase. They can get on the kitchen counter, but they take the scenic route. Munchkins are also known as ‘magpies’, often borrowing small, shiny objects and stashing them away for later play. Proficient hunters, Munchkins love a good game of catnip mouse, but when playtime is over, they want a warm lap to snuggle into and strokes from a loving hand, like any domestic.

 

Because of the small gene pool, outcrossing will need to occur for many years to keep the breed healthy. For that reason, the conformation may vary in these early years as new genes are introduced. Any domestic longhair or shorthair that is not a member of a recognized breed is an acceptable outcross. Color, pattern, and hair length will vary as well, and the Munchkin can come in any color or pattern, including the Siamese pattern. Munchkins with long flowing tresses also exist and are recognized by TICA. The conformation for the Munchkin Long-hair is the same except that the Longhair bears a semi-long silky coat that sports a full flowing plume on the tail.

Korat Cat

Korat Cat

Korats are not as vocal as their Siamese comrades; they have other ways of getting their wishes across. At dinnertime they’ll wrap themselves around your ankle, clamber up onto your shoulder, and perhaps give you a nip on the shin if you don’t hurry up with the cat food, but given something important to say, they speak their minds.

On the cat activity level scale, they are an 8: social, playful, and full of life, but not bouncing-off-the-walls hyper. They are also reported to possess high intelligence.

Like the Siamese, Korats are fetchers of tossed toys, cats whose favorite game is the one in which you take an active part. Korats crave affection from their humans, and will scheme to gain possession of your lap, your arms, and your heart.

 

Coat and color, as well as a muscular and semi-cobby body type, set this breed apart. The coat is a solid, even, silver-blue color with no tabby markings or shading, but the hair shafts themselves are lighter at the roots and shade to a darker blue just before the tips. The fur is tipped with silver, giving a silvery sheen or ‘halo effect’ to the coat. The Korat goes through an ‘ugly duckling’ phase and doesn’t attain its true beauty until two to four years of age. The eye color is not usually true until the cat matures.

Himalayan Cat

Himalayan Cat

Himmies, as fanciers call them, are perfect indoor cat companions. They are gentle, calm, and sweet-tempered, but they possess a playful side as well. Like the Siamese, Himalayans love to play fetch, and a scrap of crumpled paper or a kitty toy will entertain them for hours.

Himalayans are devoted and dependent upon their humans for companionship and protection. They crave affection and love to be petted and groomed, which is fortunate, since every Himalayan family will spend part of each day doing just that.

Like their Persian siblings, they are docile and won’t harass you for attention the way some breeds will. More vocal and active than the Persian, they nevertheless are much quieter than the Siamese.

 

The current show trend is toward a more extreme facial type. This troubles some fanciers, who feel the extreme face can be harmful to the breed. Reported problems include breathing distress, malocclusions, and birthing difficulties.

For those who like a less extreme look, the Traditional Cat Association (TCA) recognizes and promotes the original Himalayan, also called the ‘Doll Face Himalayan.’ This cat possesses a less extreme facial type.

Exotic Shorthair Cat

Exotic Shorthair Cat

Some folks who don’t appreciate that laid-back, mellow personality label Persians and their relatives ‘furniture with fur’, but in truth Exotics are playful and enjoy a good game of catching the catnip mouse between bouts of catching a few ZZZs. Because of the American Shorthair influence, Exotics are reported to be livelier than Persians, although some breeders say that the two breeds are very similar in temperament.

Undoubtedly, the Exotic personality is, if not identical, very much like the Persian’s, quiet, loyal, sweet, and affectionate. They want to be involved in their favorite humans’ lives and will quietly follow them from room to room just to see what they are doing. They also enjoy hugs and cuddles, and lavish their humans with purrs and licks of affection until the thick coat drives them away to lounge on cool kitchen linoleum or cold fireplace bricks. Fanciers point out that because of the short coat, they can spend more time playing with their Exotics than grooming them.

 

To maintain the Persian body type, coat, and diversified gene pool, it is necessary to breed back to the Persian. Roughly 50 percent of kittens from Exotic/Persian matings will have long hair if the Exotic parent carries the recessive longhair gene. Even when Exotic is bred to Exotic, the litters can contain longhairs if the longhair gene is present in both parents. This slows the process of reproducing Exotics and can be disappointing, because in the CFA Exotics with long hair cannot be shown as either Exotics or Persians. However, a movement is currently underway among breeders and fanciers to have longhaired Exotics accepted in the CFA, although it’s not certain if it will succeed. Some fanciers favor creating a new shorthaired Persian division, and others favor a longhaired and shorthaired division for Exotics.

Other associations handle the longhaired Exotics differently. For example, TICA allows them to be shown as Persians, ACFA recognizes them as Long-haired Exotics, and UFO, CFF, AACE, and CCA recognize them as Exotic Longhairs.

Egyptian Mau Cat

Egyptian Mau Cat

While fanciers might at first be attracted to the Egyptian Mau’s beautiful spotted coat, most become enthusiasts because of the breed’s temperament and personality. Maus, like their ancestors that were invited along on the duck hunts of their Egyptian companions, love to fetch. In fact, they love any play activity that mimics hunting behavior, and if allowed outside will become very competent (some might say savage) hunters.

That’s not to say they are not devoted to the humans who pay them homage. Fanciers describe them as fiercely loyal cats that generally don’t take to strangers. Once they bond with their human companions, they choose to be worshiped by their own family, rather than by the entire human race.

While not overly talkative, Maus will let their family know if something is amiss, particularly if that something concerns their food dishes. Their voices are usually melodious and quiet. When engaged in conversation with their human companions, Maus wag their tails, tread with their feet, and make a variety of sounds that fanciers call ‘chortling’.

 

One of this breed’s most striking features is its random, distinctive spots. Considerable variety exists in placement and shape. The spots can be large or small, round or oblong, or combinations thereof. What is important is that the spots be vivid and distinct, with good contrast between the background color and the color of the spots. The face bears tabby markings including the characteristic ‘M’ on the forehead, which is sometimes described as a scarab beetle mark. Two mascara lines grace the cheeks. The first begins at the corner of the eye and continues along the cheek’s contour. As the story goes, ancient Egyptian women patterned their elaborate eye makeup after the Mau’s markings.

Cymric Cat

Cymric Cat

The personality of the Cymric has won a strong following despite the breeding challenges. Cymrics are intelligent, fun-loving cats, and they get along well with other pets, including dogs. Cymrics are particularly noted for their loyalty to their humans and enjoy spending quality time with them. As cats go, they can be easily taught tricks. Despite their playful temperament, they are gentle and nonaggressive. Their playful yet tractable dispositions are good for families with children.

Cymrics are powerful jumpers and if sufficiently motivated will manage to breach the most secure shelf. They are also fascinated by water, as long as you don’t dunk them in the nasty stuff. Perhaps this fascination comes from originating on a small piece of land surrounded by it.

 

Cymrics come in a variety of tail lengths. The tail types are broken into four classifications: rumpy, rumpy-riser, stumpy, and longy. Since the tailless gene is dominant, all Cymrics that possess the Manx gene will have one of the four tail types. Rumpies are completely tailless and are prized because they can compete successfully in the show ring. They often have a dimple at the base of the spine where the tail would be if it were present. Rumpy-risers that possess a short knob of tail, stumpies that have an often curved or kinked tail stump, and longies that have tails almost as long as that of an average cat, are used for breeding or are placed as pets. Many breeders dock the tails of the longies to make it easier to find homes for them.

Burmese Cat

Burmese Cat

Breeders and fanciers report that Burmese are amusing, playful, and super-smart, the perfect interactive cats for home, office, shop, any place where people are in need of love and entertainment. They are as active as the Siamese and love to play. Devoted cats, Burmese are loyal and people-oriented.

Breeders report temperament differences between males and females. The females are highly curious, active, and very emotionally involved with their family. The altered males love their humans too, but are more placid. They like to lounge about, usually on top of whatever you’re doing. They take life as it comes. The only issue about which they are passionately concerned is the selected cuisine and when it will be served.

Burmese have a unique rasp to their voices and sound a bit like cats going hoarse from too much talking. Burmese are not as talkative as their Siamese neighbors. When they have something to say, however, they’ll reiterate the message until you get out your universal feline/human translator and take care of whatever it is troubling them.

 

The Burmese’s body style has changed over the years. The 1953 standard described the Burmese as medium, dainty, and long. By 1957 the standard was changed to midway between Domestic Shorthair and Siamese. The words ‘somewhat compact’ were added to the standard in 1959; the word somewhat was dropped from the standard somewhat later. Since then, the standard has remained virtually un-changed.

Over the last 20 years or so a difference of opinion has developed among breeders as to the favored conformation of the breed. One group favors the European Burmese, longer, narrower muzzles with a less pronounced nose break and a slightly narrower head. The other favors the contemporary Burmese, shorter, broader muzzle, pronounced nose break, and broader, rounder head shapes. Because of this, two conformation types exist today. In the CFA, the European Burmese has just been accepted as a breed in his own right in the miscellaneous class. (In International Division shows they are eligible for championship.) In CFF, CCA, and UFO, the breed is recognized under the name ‘Foreign Burmese’. TCA recognizes the classic and traditional Burmese.

One of the main differences between the two breeds, besides the head and body type, is that the European Burmese comes in additional colors. Because the Burmese was crossbred with European Siamese lines that possessed the red gene, the colors red and cream were introduced, producing six additional colors.

British Shorthair Cat

British Shorthair Cat

If you’re looking for a cat that will loot your refrigerator and swing dizzily from your chandeliers, then the British Shorthair is not for you. Brits are quiet, even-tempered, undemanding cats with a bit of typical British reserve, particularly when they’re first introduced. When they get over their initial shyness, however, they become extremely faithful companions. British Shorthairs tend to show their loyalty to the entire family rather than select one person with whom to bond. British Shorthair breeders describe Brits as cats that like to keep a low profile, sweet and affectionate but not clingy ‘in-your-face’ type cats. They tend to be independent and if left on their own can usually adapt quite well.

 

Like the American Shorthair, the British Shorthair is known for its health and vigor. The breed is cobby in design, compact and powerful with a round, massive face and head. This head design sets the breed apart from other breeds developed from domestic shorthairs. A very dense, short, resilient coat is important in the show British Shorthair. The fur feels solid to the touch, like sinking your fingers into firm, warm velvet. The coat is not double-coated or woolly, which makes up-keep easier; however, regular grooming is important. Although blue is the most common, the British Shorthair comes in a variety of colors and patterns.